The Terror: Infamy – My Sweet Boy Review

On this week’s episode of The Terror: Infamy, My Sweet Boy, Chester (Derek Mio) and Luz (Cristina Rodlo) reconnect as Yuko (Kiki Suzekane) starts to show her endgame and Amy (Miki Ishikawa) must deal with the consequences of her actions after Major Bowen (C. Thomas Howell) returns from Washington D.C.

With Chester and Luz now living under one roof again, the two begin to feel closer to one another and the fact that they consummate their love by getting married. It’s sweet to see them reconcile their feelings for one another and now establish that there’s no tearing them apart now. However, Luz begins to worry about her father as she thinks he’s gone missing, even though we know that Yuko killed him in the previous episode, and she discloses some interesting info about her family. While the reveal that Luz’s family can tap into some supernatural magic in order to see the dead is interesting, it also feels a little random. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a very interesting sequence that’s definitely important to the overall story, but it’s just feels so thrown in and isn’t really explored in depth much. I feel like a broken record saying, but perhaps the show could still touch on this more. However, with only two episodes left, it’s incredibly doubtful.

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Chester delves deeper into the supernatural this week. PHOTO: Signal Horizon

This new supernatural element does create an interesting reunion between Chester and a younger version of his brother, Jirou (Pierce King), though, and leads to viewers figuring out what Yuko’s endgame really is. The initial reunion between brother is actually very touching with Chester playing catch with him to make him feel better. Things take a dark turn, though, with Yuko taking over Chester in the dreamscape and seemingly taking Jirou to her “perfect world.” There’s definitely a creepiness to the moment, but it resembles a major problem I have with Yuko and the spiritual elements of the show – nothing is explained in the moment. The rules and limitations of Yuko’s power seem non-existent and it just constantly makes me scratch my head when she does something so random that heavily changes what’s happening. Not to mention, while it makes sense that Yuko is truly after Chester’s kin rather than Chester so that she can live a full life as a mother, the reveal of Luz being pregnant again comes off very abrupt because of how quickly time passes and how suddenly the series moves from event to event.

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Bowen (pictured above) gets payback against Amy this week. PHOTO: Den of Geek

Things run a little smoother with Amy side of this episode as she deals with her actions of recording Major Bowen and sending it to Washington. Unsurprisingly, Amy’s efforts end up being futile as Bowen seemingly comes back fine but has sinister plans for Amy. While it’s obvious that Bowen has Amy’s actions in the back of his mind, Howell’s performances definitely makes it a lot of fun before things take a dark turn. There’s definitely a high tension that comes from Bowen taking Amy, but it doesn’t last for long enough. It would’ve been more interesting to see their exchanges in the bunker from the start of the episode to the end. Also, the way Bowen gets Amy is a little shaky to me with how the situation is cut. It is sad to see Bowen go, simply because Howell gives such a fun villain performance, but with the Japanese American seemingly being let go out of the camps, it’s leave room open to hopefully delve deeper into Yuko and her endgame.

The Terror: Infamy hits some bumps in the road with My Sweet Boy and suffers from its lack of explanation and depth of its antagonist’s abilities. While it’s surprising to see the series to have such issues so late in the game, I’m sure it can rebound within these last two episodes to give fans the riveting finale that’s been baking all season long.

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Watch the Trailer Here:

 

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